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Geminiani: Concerti grossi, Op. 3
Francesco Geminiani, Europa Galante, Fabio Bonizzoni
Geminiani: Concerti grossi, Op. 3
Genre: Classical
 
Geminiani was a talented composer, and one of the greatest violinists of his day (he died in 1762). His made his career largely in England, and was a colleague of both Corelli, who was his teacher, and Handel. His concerto...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Francesco Geminiani, Europa Galante, Fabio Bonizzoni
Title: Geminiani: Concerti grossi, Op. 3
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Opus 111
Release Date: 10/14/1997
Genre: Classical
Styles: Chamber Music, Forms & Genres, Concertos, Historical Periods, Baroque (c.1600-1750)
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 709861301720

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Geminiani was a talented composer, and one of the greatest violinists of his day (he died in 1762). His made his career largely in England, and was a colleague of both Corelli, who was his teacher, and Handel. His concertos follow what Corelli called the Church Sonata form--generally four movements in a slow-fast-slow-fast pattern. Also like Corelli, Geminiani published very little music, there being only three collections of concertos of which Opus 3 was the most important and popular. They are exceptionally well performed by Fabio Biondi, who is a real master of the Baroque violin. Sonics and presentation are truly first class as well. --David Hurwitz

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CD Reviews

Noble melancholy
S. Gustafson | New Albany, IN USA | 12/06/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Before the late, galante Baroque familiar to drive-time classical music listeners, usually in the form of Vivaldi, there was a romantic Baroque. Romantic Baroque sought expressiveness in the midst of its contrapuntal intensity. J. S. Bach is a familiar late example of this deeply-felt Baroque intensity. Geminiani is another example who deserves a wider audience.
He gets just a footnote in the textbooks because he was not responsible for major technical innovations. His contemporaries referred to him as 'Il Furibondo,' sensing a certain wildness in his rhythmic and melodic intentions. This is not Baroque music for the dinner, the bathtub, or the drive home. This is Baroque music that demands your attention.
The concerti in minor keys display the most inspired melodies, and fortunately they predominate. Their contrapuntal depth is always several layers deeper than you'll hear in Vivaldi. The several reprises in Op. 3, no. 6, and the unusual gigue of the final Allegro will strike you with their inventiveness, as will the remarkable opening and fugato of the G minor No. 2.
This is a good performance and recording of these remarkable works. Geminiani is a composer who will serve you well to enoble your melancholy moods."