Search - Gato Barbieri :: Last Tango in Paris - O.S.T. (Bonus Tracks) (RMST)

Last Tango in Paris - O.S.T. (Bonus Tracks) (RMST)
Gato Barbieri
Last Tango in Paris - O.S.T. (Bonus Tracks) (RMST)
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Soundtracks, Latin Music
 
  •  Track Listings (40) - Disc #1

Despite a famously raving review by American film critic grand dame Pauline Kael (who dubbed it "the most powerfully erotic movie ever made") Bernardo Bertolucci's often unfocused 1973 meditation on sexuality, existenti...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Gato Barbieri
Title: Last Tango in Paris - O.S.T. (Bonus Tracks) (RMST)
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Varese Sarabande
Original Release Date: 2/7/1973
Re-Release Date: 5/11/2004
Album Type: Extra tracks, Original recording remastered, Soundtrack
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Soundtracks, Latin Music
Styles: Latin Jazz, Orchestral Jazz, Latin Pop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 030206657029

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Despite a famously raving review by American film critic grand dame Pauline Kael (who dubbed it "the most powerfully erotic movie ever made") Bernardo Bertolucci's often unfocused 1973 meditation on sexuality, existential angst and inventive uses of butter can now seem as quaintly compelling as wide collared blazers and velveteen trousers. Indeed, Argentine jazz saxophonist Gato Barbieri's evocative score has aged better than much of the film. Bertolucci's conceit to structure the film loosely around the erotic duel that's at the heart of the Tango led him to seek a non-traditional musician to score it (Tango legend Astor Piazzolla was rumored to have been an early consideration). Once selected, the then-largely obscure Barbieri originally produced a series of brief, Tango-jazz fusion cues that functioned more as emotional punctuation than traditional underscore. Those musical snippets were later re-arranged and re-recorded by Oliver Nelson for the wildly successful soundtrack album; it would be another quarter century before Barbieri's own recordings were issued, albeit briefly. Both Barbieri's and Nelson's work are reunited here in a comprehensive edition, emotive fusion-jazz that--for better or worse--virtually opened the door to mainstream jazz successes like Kenny G and the so-called Wave radio format. --Jerry McCulley
 

CD Reviews

Gato Barbieri - LAST TANGO IN PARIS [Soundtrack]
Tom Benton | North Springfield, VT USA | 08/18/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Gato Barbieri's soundtrack for Bernardo Bertolucci's criminally underappreciated masterpiece is an equally impressive album that is as wonderful a solo work as it is a film soundtrack. It's a magical fusing of Latin, tango, and above all else, jazz, filled with beautiful symphonic arrangements and powerful saxophone solos performed by Barbieri himself. The 2004 reissue includes all the Grammy-winning album's original tracks as well as a 29-minute suite containing 28 cues personally selected by Barbieri. The real accomplishment here is that the music is just as emotional if you haven't seen the film as it is if you have. Certainly one of the finest soundtracks of all time. Highly recommended."
Magisterial Over-The-Edge Romantic Fusion
cvairag | Allan Hancock College | 11/06/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"1) Lays claim to being the greatest soundtrack ever recorded.
2) Generally undisputed, if not widely known, jazz masterpiece.
3) Gato's finest sustained studio effort on disk (though not as popular as his more mainstream pop efforts which became staple 70's muzak).
4) Deeply felt - emotionally charged - lavishly self-indulgent - uabashedly romantic, melodramatic - finally profound.
5) I personally find it far more affecting than the moving, but rather darkly existential film, which I have not seen since its initial run in the theaters long ago.
6) If you like Gato, or simply moody, introspective jazz fusion, from a medium to large ensemble - you won't go wrong here: one of the greatest."
Strange and exotic
John R. Sullivan | Havre de Grace, MD USA | 12/17/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Once again, the "professional" reviewer at the top, Mr. McCulley, has his head inextricably wedged in a certain body cavity. I suppose originality in the cinema IS "quaintly compelling," when one compares "Last Tango in Paris" to today's timid, imbecilic fare. Maybe he should focus on the movie itself instead of the fact that characters in 1973 are wearing clothes made in...1973. Also comparing Barbieri's haunting and often wrenching score to Kenny G is a bit much. I remember my parents playing this album when I was a kid, and I knew even then that it meant something strange and exotic. It also helped to introduce me to jazz. Kudos Bertolucci, Schneider, Brando and Barbieri. They literally don't make 'em like this anymore."