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Very Best of Fritz Wunderlich
Fritz Wunderlich
Very Best of Fritz Wunderlich
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (16) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (19) - Disc #2

Fritz Wunderlich is one of those singers whose voice, while you are listening to it, seems to eclipse all others. Ravishingly beautiful, perfectly produced, radiant, even, mellow, it flows out with effortless ease like a g...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Fritz Wunderlich
Title: Very Best of Fritz Wunderlich
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: EMI Classics
Release Date: 4/22/2003
Genre: Classical
Style: Opera & Classical Vocal
Number of Discs: 2
SwapaCD Credits: 2
UPC: 724357591522

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Fritz Wunderlich is one of those singers whose voice, while you are listening to it, seems to eclipse all others. Ravishingly beautiful, perfectly produced, radiant, even, mellow, it flows out with effortless ease like a golden stream. His breath is endless, and there is nothing that he cannot do. On these two very generous discs he sings arias ranging from Handel to Viennese operettas and sounds equally at home in all of them, vocally and stylistically. Mozart was one of his specialties, and the five arias opening the program have a beguiling, caressing lyricism that melts the heart. The selection includes familiar arias by Wagner, Tchaikovsky, Massenet, Donizetti, Smetana (including a duet with Pilar Lorengar), as well as several by composers whose operas were popular in the 1960s, when the records were made, but have now fallen into oblivion, such as Lortzing, Flotow, Cornelius, Kienzl, Nicolai, Thomas, Boieledieu. Wunderlich sings them all with the same seriousness and commitment, making the lesser ones sound better than they are, and creating real characters with color, nuance and expression. In keeping with the European tradition of performing opera in the local language, he sings everything in German, except the famous "Ombra mai fu" from Handel's Serse, which must have escaped the translators. Choosing from the best operettas by Lehár, Johann Strauss, Millöcker, Kálmán and Fall, he captures their smiling, tongue-in-cheek lightness and never lets the catchy tunes become corny or sentimental. (Listen also to his two very different, but equally wonderful recordings of Mahler's Song of the Earth under Schmidt-Isserstedt on BellaVoce and Klemperer.) In 1966, aged 36, at the peak of his artistry and his career, Wunderlich died after a fall, a month before he was to make his debut at the Metropolitan Opera. --Edith Eisler
 

CD Reviews

Elegant collection though everything...auf Deutsch!
Armindo | Greece | 05/02/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Among the lyric tenors, Wunderlich had one of the most handsome voices and a strength not usually related to this type of tenors. One melancholically wonders how much his repertoire could have expanded, had he lived longer. This new VERY BEST collection has arias of some of his trademark Mozart roles, songs and arias of less popular composers as well as some famous arias of the Italian repertoire. He sings them all with memorable style, unparalleled beauty of tone and - where needed - the right vigour. I only wish he'd escaped the tradition of those decades and recorded the Italian and French arias in their original language and not in German. Only "Ombra mai fu" is sung in Italian and it doesn't reveal any bad Italian accent. Listening for example to his lovely "Una furtiva lagrima" in German is unique for sure but I prefer the Italian version. His life was brief but the quality of his singing eternal."
Very Best of Fritz Wunderlich
R. MacDonald | Singleton, Western Australia | 01/09/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Fritz Wunderlich is still one of the Best. This CD is very good value for money, such a variety of songs, excellent tone quality."
No texts -- shame on you EMI
J. Kuplinsky | nj, nj USA | 02/11/2007
(2 out of 5 stars)

"This is not a gripe about Wunderlich, one of the greatest IMHO. It is about the EMI folks, who obviously think that song texts are irrelevant. Well, how do you know if the singing does justice to the text? And if you think that these texts are easily available elsewhere, I would be most thankful if you would share with me Lehar's "Das Land des L"achelns" Kalman's "die Zirkusprinzessin" or Neuendorff's "Der Rattenf"anger"."