Search - Fred Jackson :: Hootin' 'n Tootin'

Hootin' 'n Tootin'
Fred Jackson
Hootin' 'n Tootin'
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (14) - Disc #1

On Hootin' 'N Tootin', the listener is afforded the opportunity of hearing numbers of a famous orchestra noted for its smart arrangements along the rhythm and blues influence. The moods expressed are in the 'down home' and...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Fred Jackson
Title: Hootin' 'n Tootin'
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Analogue Productions ORIGINALS
Original Release Date: 1/1/2009
Re-Release Date: 7/14/2009
Album Type: Enhanced, Hybrid SACD - DSD, Import
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Styles: Jazz Fusion, Soul-Jazz & Boogaloo
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 753088409462

Synopsis

Product Description
On Hootin' 'N Tootin', the listener is afforded the opportunity of hearing numbers of a famous orchestra noted for its smart arrangements along the rhythm and blues influence. The moods expressed are in the 'down home' and 'down to Earth' groove. Under the leadership of Fred Jackson on tenor sax, the listener is propelled into the world of the new truth.

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CD Reviews

Side men to the fore
Dave R | Lydd, Kent United Kingdom | 11/30/2001
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This album offers a unique chance to hear two of the music world's most solid session players in a no-pressure jazz groove. Fred Jackson's horn has been giving quality support to all kinds of artists for decades (check out his listing in AMG). Here he shows he is more than capable of remaining inventive way beyond sandwiched session breaks. His improvisations never flag once throughout the album. Organist on the session is none other than Motown bandleader, Earl Van Dyke, just around the time Mickey Stevenson gave him the job. He would go on to develop and define The Motown Sound, as well as being one of the hottest Hammond players on stage. Here, though, the 'Chunk of Funk' exhibits little of the dazzling solo phrasing heard in later recordings. Instead, he demonstrates how he came to be recognised as the best accompanist in the business - especially on the first seven tracks, whose basslines he creates on the pedals of the B3 organ. As he would later do with Robert White, James Jamerson and Benny Benjamin, Van Dyke melds with Willie Jones and Wilbert Hogan to form a single entity, alive to every turn of Jackson's tenor. This album is still a joy and a worldwide favourite, forty years on."
Fred Jackson, Hootin n' Tootin
Chris Covais | 11/12/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is one of those albums that didn't sell when it first came out, but it's getting revisited by the younger generation like us.

Fred Jackson, wasn't the most known recording artist for Blue Note, nor was he the most popular, but the cover art seems to be a BN staple.

Fred Jackson was basically a rhythm and blues saxophonist, and for some reason, he wanted to play jazz, so he got together with some musicians and recorded this album.

All the tunes are blues. This is most definately a soul-jazz ocassion. The songs are groovy, the melodies aren't exactly genious, and the album swings. This album might be anything from a classic, but its nice to sit back and groove to.
"
Excellent, soulful tenor
Chris Covais | 04/24/1998
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This is an excellent tenor/organ disc of what was originally two records, by an artist otherwise forgotten. Jackson has a strong tone and is an excellent blues improvisor."