Search - Frankie Goes To Hollywood :: Liverpool (Reis)

Liverpool (Reis)
Frankie Goes To Hollywood
Liverpool (Reis)
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1

Japanese-only paper sleeve pressing of the digitally remastered and expanded edition of the controversial '80s band's 1986 album including four remixes added as bonus tracks, Rage Hard (Montreaux Popfest/live), Watching th...  more »

      

CD Details

All Artists: Frankie Goes To Hollywood
Title: Liverpool (Reis)
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Umvd Labels
Release Date: 10/20/1998
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock
Styles: New Wave & Post-Punk, Dance Pop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 4009910489727, 601215319729, 042284235617, 042284235648, 5011997322834

Synopsis

Album Description
Japanese-only paper sleeve pressing of the digitally remastered and expanded edition of the controversial '80s band's 1986 album including four remixes added as bonus tracks, Rage Hard (Montreaux Popfest/live), Watching the Wildlife (Die Letzten Der Menschheit), Warriors of the Wasteland (Twelve Wild Disciplines Mix) and (Don't lose what's left) of Your Little Mind (12 inch Mix). Though not as well received as their debut, Liverpool is much more focused than it's predecessor. Features the singles 'Rage Hard', 'Watching The Wildlife' and 'Warriors Of The Wasteland'. 12 tracks. 3D.
 

CD Reviews

Strong on its own merits
Mattias Thuresson | 03/05/2001
(4 out of 5 stars)

"If Frankie's debut album 'Welcome to the Pleasuredome' had many high's and low's, their second and last album Liverpool was more even in quality. Liverpool is more conventional. Although it lacks hits like 'Two Tribes' and 'Relax' it neither has the space-fillers and boring chit-chat of the overlong'Welcome...'. Featuring a string of good songs, my favourites are 'Watching the Wildlife' and 'For Heaven's sake'. It would have been interesting if Frankie wouldn't have split up and too see where they would have gone from Liverpool. This album deserves a listening to anyone who likes Frankie's chart toppers."
Maximum joy
Mattias Thuresson | 06/17/2000
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Very good album. I give it 4 stars because of the debut album Welcome to the pleasure dome which was more original and fresher. But this album is very underrated. Beside the hits: Rage Hard and Warriors there is a lot on this album to keep you listening. Like the moving ballad Is anybody out there whinch is sing by Holly Johnson with such incredible ease, beautiful! And then there is Maximun Joy a very danceable song but in a different way then Relax was. Maximum Joy is also the title of the forthcoming Best of which is gonna contain a lot of remixes. They really haver tried to make this album different and it worked quite well, Lunar Bay is a bit experimental and not like other bands. Even today the sound original and not typical eighties. If you like Frankie in a little rougher version than they were on Welcome check this album out. Good!"
Frankie say: Good stuff from essential 80's band
Mattias Thuresson | 01/15/1999
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Okay, so this isn't another 'Pleasuredome' - but then again, how can you be expected to top such a debut? And thank God Frankie didn't try to make an album like their first one. 'Liverpool' consists of 8 songs with no funny tags or conversations squeezed in between them. It kicks off with 'Warriors Of The Wasteland', at first atmospheric and then aggressive, and continues with the pleasantly bombastic 'Rage Hard', arguably the best song on the album. The contents of the disc are actually quite varied. There is guitar rock on 'Kill The Pain', a sequencer/synth orgy on 'Maximum Joy', and lush orchestrated sounds on 'Watching The Wildlife'. The album closes with the atmospheric 'Is Anybody Out There?' which is just as moving as 'The Power Of Love' off their debut. If you can manage to separate the music from all the things that happened during the recording (Holly and the lads' constant fighting about which direction the album should take and Trevor Horn driving everybody bonkers) this actually is an album of very enjoyable songs produced in the typical perfectionist, larger-than-life Horn/Lipson fashion and performed energeticly by the band. Too bad that the Frankie era didn't last, but it sure as h*** was fun."