Search - Frances Day :: Golden Girl of the 1930s

Golden Girl of the 1930s
Frances Day
Golden Girl of the 1930s
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Broadway & Vocalists
 
  •  Track Listings (24) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (25) - Disc #2

(2-CD set) Spotted in a New York Speakeasy, she was bought to London in 1924 by Australian impresario Beaumont Alexander who immediately divested her of her American accent, dyed her hair platinum blonde (before Jean Harlo...  more »

      
?

Larger Image

CD Details

All Artists: Frances Day
Title: Golden Girl of the 1930s
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Avid Records UK
Original Release Date: 1/1/2008
Re-Release Date: 3/11/2008
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Broadway & Vocalists
Styles: Vocal Jazz, Easy Listening, Vocal Pop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 5022810192626

Synopsis

Album Description
(2-CD set) Spotted in a New York Speakeasy, she was bought to London in 1924 by Australian impresario Beaumont Alexander who immediately divested her of her American accent, dyed her hair platinum blonde (before Jean Harlow!) and launched her into the world of exotic West End cabaret where she was known for performing in nothing but a g-string and feather boa...and this was 1925! The Thirties were Frances' decade and she appeared in countless shows and films, her greatest success being the stunning stage production of Jill Darling. She was a song stylist of supreme individuality as this wonderfully re-mastered double CD from Avid clearly shows.

Similar CDs

 

CD Reviews

SHE HAD THAT EXTRA SOMETHING
Barry McCanna | Normandy, France | 03/26/2008
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Frances Day starred on stage and in films during the thirties and early forties, and this 2-CD set encapsulates her career. Accompaniments include those of Ray Noble, Louis Levy, Carroll Gibbons, George Scott Wood, Geraldo, Jay Wilbur, and Henry Hall, and she duets with Max Kirby, Al Bowlly, Arthur Riscoe, John Mills, and Bud Flanagan (with whom she performs a somewhat bowdlerised version of Cole Porter's "But In The Morning, No!"). Four of the tracks are recordings of radio broadcasts, including "Summertime" with Geraldo, and the parody "An Englishman Spoke In Grosvenor Square" with Henry Hall. In his comprehensive liner note, Michael Thornton refers to her habit of "bending the words, and often the music also, to her own fey persona". That succeeds in most cases, but what works on stage does not always transfer well to record. "S'cuse Me" in particular, sounds like a cross between Betty Boop and Shirley Temple! But the few less successful tracks are far outweighed by the many delights in this attractively packaged compilation."