Search - Floyd Dixon :: Marshall Texas Is My Home

Marshall Texas Is My Home
Floyd Dixon
Marshall Texas Is My Home
Genres: Blues, Pop, R&B
 
  •  Track Listings (22) - Disc #1

After leaving Aladdin Records in 1952, Floyd Dixon crossed Los Angeles to record for Specialty. The groove was much the same: mellow, reflective supper club blues with a heavier emphasis on uptempo numbers to reflect ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Floyd Dixon
Title: Marshall Texas Is My Home
Members Wishing: 4
Total Copies: 0
Label: Specialty
Release Date: 8/5/1991
Genres: Blues, Pop, R&B
Styles: Regional Blues, West Coast Blues, Jump Blues, Piano Blues, Classic R&B
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 022211701125, 025218701143, 029667136129, 090204042647

Synopsis

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After leaving Aladdin Records in 1952, Floyd Dixon crossed Los Angeles to record for Specialty. The groove was much the same: mellow, reflective supper club blues with a heavier emphasis on uptempo numbers to reflect the approach of rock & roll. Only rarely, as on the hillbilly-Mexican novelty "Me Quieras," is there a true change-of-pace. What makes this set worthwhile is its inclusion of Dixon's original version of "Hey Bartender," covered by the Blues Brothers on their megaplatinum first album. Also notable, though far less successful, was his stab at rock & roll. "Oooh Little Girl" is like hearing Nat Cole imitate Little Richard. --Colin Escott

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CD Reviews

Classic R&B/Jump-Blues
Sam Mosley | Toronto, Ontario | 11/02/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This fine collection brings together many of Floyd Dixon's singles he recorded after leaving Aladdin, which were recorded not only for Specialty but several other smaller label like Cash and Ebb. Also included is the classic original version of "Hey Bartender", which was recorded for the Atlantic subsidiary Cat. Dixon's style is somewhat varied between Charles Brown-style slow tunes like "Call Operator 210" and "Chicken Crowing" to Amos Milburn-style rocker's like "Hole in the Wall" and "Nose Trouble", which also have a more humorous style to them. The only real departures from these include the silly "Me Quieras" and the Little Richard-style "Oooh Little Girl", both of which are two of the weaker tracks on this collection. Also, "Carlos" is more in the Big Jay McNeely style (an out of control saxophone instrumental). Surprisingly, many of these songs were unissued at the time, despite being very good songs.
This is a terrific collection of R&B and Jump-Blues. Despite a few dud tracks, the majority of the songs makes up for this and makes this a terrific collection by an R&B legend (who is still going strong today).
"