Search - Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea :: Evening With Herbie Hancock & Chick Corea

Evening With Herbie Hancock & Chick Corea
Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea
Evening With Herbie Hancock & Chick Corea
Genres: Jazz, Pop, R&B
 
  •  Track Listings (3) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (4) - Disc #2

It's unlikely that two major musicians could have more in common than Chick Corea and Herbie Hancock. Born a year apart, they both got their starts on Blue Note sessions in the early 1960s, worked extensively with Miles Da...  more »

      
1

Larger Image
Listen to Samples

CD Details

All Artists: Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea
Title: Evening With Herbie Hancock & Chick Corea
Members Wishing: 4
Total Copies: 0
Label: Sony
Original Release Date: 1/1/1996
Re-Release Date: 6/9/1998
Album Type: Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered, Live
Genres: Jazz, Pop, R&B
Styles: Jazz Fusion, Modern Postbebop, Bebop
Number of Discs: 2
SwapaCD Credits: 2
UPC: 074646555125

Synopsis

Amazon.com
It's unlikely that two major musicians could have more in common than Chick Corea and Herbie Hancock. Born a year apart, they both got their starts on Blue Note sessions in the early 1960s, worked extensively with Miles Davis (albeit in very different periods), and were among the architects and biggest successes of fusion in the 1970s. Equally distinguished as pianists and composers, they share many of the same influences, both in classical music (Ravel, Debussy, Bartók) and jazz (Davis, John Coltrane, and Bill Evans), and in the late 1970s, both were dividing their time between electric and acoustic projects. This 1978 duet concert testifies to a remarkable empathy, along with the polish that each brings to any venture. Their two grand pianos seldom collide as they dovetail and overlay runs, rhythms, and chords, clearly enjoying the challenge and creating tremendous energy in the process. "Someday" inevitably invokes Miles, while the chromatic fantasia on Gershwin's "Liza," complete with stride, suggests populist roots in Rhapsody in Blue. "Button Up," an extended improvisation, is a highlight, including rhythmic dialogue between hand-muted strings, while "February Moment" is a relatively rare Hancock foray into solo piano. The most remarkable playing, though, is saved for the end: segued performances of hits--Hancock's "Maiden Voyage" and Corea's "La Fiesta"--that run to 35 minutes of sustained keyboard invention. --Stuart Broomer

Similar CDs


Similarly Requested CDs

 

CD Reviews

Great Stuff
A Pianist | 12/27/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Not much more to add after the other reviewers, just wanted to emphasize how great this album is. This is truly a must have for anyone who loves jazz piano. Track 3, "Button Up," on the first disc is simply amazing, with some of the most beautiful exchanges on the recording. (Anyone else notice the person in the audience yelling out "Christmas!" at 13:33 on that track? I can't figure it out...) Also, I would like to add, that anyone who is really intrigued and awed by Herbie's touch on the keys should check him out on a recording of Maurice Ravel's Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in G (especially the 2nd movement). All in all, with these guys playing together, you cannot possibly go wrong!"
Absolutely outstanding
book maven | 05/11/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I'm generally not a fan of solo piano (or even piano duets!) but this album is fantastic. The passion and creativity of the playing makes one of those rare discs that one can listen to over and over and over again without it losing any of its freshness. Particularly breathtaking is "La Fiesta" on the 2nd disc, performed by Herbie Hancock, with its allusions to the Spanish Civil War song "Venga Jaleo." The melodic themes of that song received previous prodigious treatment by John Coltrane on "Ole," another disc I recommend as a must-have. This disc will also appeal to your friends who say they "don't like jazz" and is a good one to play when they come over."
One of the last Milestones In Jazz Piano From 1970 onward
Tobias | United States | 04/21/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

""Some day My Prince Will Come" is one of the few true innovative Steps In Jazz Piano of the last Thirty years.Whether Solo Or Duo-and whether it was influenced By Miles Version or not.It is compositional in it's structure.And those Bridge-Transition-Turnaround-Sections are so Rhythmically and harmonically brilliant,you have to think that CC & HH worked out much of it.The Whole thing is just so beautifuly wrought.The rest of the album is great,but SDMPWC is the reason to get this.Just Beautifil.Piano Sounds you have never heard or will hear any where else."