Search - Boyd Rice, Frank Tovey :: Easy Listening for the Hard of Hearing

Easy Listening for the Hard of Hearing
Boyd Rice, Frank Tovey
Easy Listening for the Hard of Hearing
Genres: Alternative Rock, Special Interest, Pop, Rock
 
Boyd Rice and Frank Tovey collaborated on this album called East Listening for the Hard of Hearing, which is composed on 12 tracks labeled ""extractions"" 1-12. Each extraction is a minimalist noise song, none of which use...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Boyd Rice, Frank Tovey
Title: Easy Listening for the Hard of Hearing
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Mute
Release Date: 3/3/2003
Album Type: Import
Genres: Alternative Rock, Special Interest, Pop, Rock
Styles: Goth & Industrial, Experimental Music, Easy Listening
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1

Synopsis

Album Description
Boyd Rice and Frank Tovey collaborated on this album called East Listening for the Hard of Hearing, which is composed on 12 tracks labeled ""extractions"" 1-12. Each extraction is a minimalist noise song, none of which use any conventional musical instruments. Instead the two use various everyday objects, a gas fire, water pipes and any furniture that happened to by lying around Blackwing studios as instruments. First released in 1984. Mute Records.

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CD Reviews

A risky endeavor, but ultimately disappointing
Twiddles42 | MN, USA | 07/29/2009
(2 out of 5 stars)

"A recent Fad Gadget/Frank Tovey compilation album featured the second track from this album. I took to it fairly quickly, and sought out this album, thinking the other tracks would be of similar caliber. Especially as the Fad Gadget albums have a unique charm, particularly with the music, that had piqued my interest.

Oops.

Upon listening to all 12 tracks, only that second one is really any good for replay value. The remainder just don't have the same grab. That is my own personal preference talking; subjectiveness is inevitable with the arts...

What makes this album unique is there are no real instruments. Only found objects (e.g. washboards, empty bottles, keys, and a motley assortment of any number of bric-a-bracs...), whose resonance and other audible features were used as makeshift instruments. It's an interesting experiment by Boyd Rice and Frank, but it just does not gel together as much as I had hoped.

There is a use of rhythm present in each track. Yet it's just a bunch of noises that lack a melody to go along with the rhythm. Save for track 2, of course.

It's definitely worthy as a historical piece of study for a thesis, but like math nowadays (if those student assessment tests are themselves accurate), historical value isn't much valued either.


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