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White Magic for Lovers
Drugstore
White Magic for Lovers
Genres: Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

While this British band's self-titled debut self-consciously aped the moody sprawl of Mazzy Star, White Magic is a dramatic leap in a different direction, and they don't waste a second letting you know it. "Say Hello" open...  more »

      
   
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CD Details

All Artists: Drugstore
Title: White Magic for Lovers
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 1
Label: Roadrunner Records
Release Date: 6/9/1998
Genres: Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock
Style: Indie & Lo-Fi
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 016861871123, 016861871147, 4988015078640

Synopsis

Amazon.com
While this British band's self-titled debut self-consciously aped the moody sprawl of Mazzy Star, White Magic is a dramatic leap in a different direction, and they don't waste a second letting you know it. "Say Hello" opens the album with sloppy loud guitar, Stereolab-esque bleeps and whistles, a Latino trumpet frill, and Brazilian chanteuse Isabel Monteiro's newly confident vocals. After that manifesto, the band makes no missteps: White Magic is startlingly original and fresh. The highlight is "El President," which features a duet with Radiohead's Thom Yorke, whose whispy soprano meshes beautifully with Monteiro's breathy (and sexy!) rasp. Perhaps Drugstore learned a trick or two from Yorke, for the songs here, like on Radiohead's OK Computer, are complex, challenging, and completely rewarding. --Tod Nelson

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CD Reviews

What's with the lukewarm reviews?
03/25/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This album seems a world away from their debut (isn't it available anymore? Crying shame, that). The dark, brooding feel of the first outing barely made it onto this album, although it definitely creeps in. White Magic has a more outright rock feel, less obsessive gloominess, and well...diversity. The first track--a wonderful ode to losers like you-- starts off kind of rough, but soon a very earnest latin horn section turns it into a shout-along anthem. Song For Pessoa is exactly that, and its a soothing, sparse guitar lullaby that ends in a (Portuguese?) recitation. Very nice. Drum-machine confined I Don't Wanna Be Here Without You is probably the lightest moment, and if you are familiar with Monteiro's lyrics, you know its the quirky instrumentation that makes it so! Mondo Cane proves they've got rock swagger, as if you had reason to doubt. Typically, they use cello in several songs, and it always sounds perfect. That's one of the reasons I liked their debut so much. Monteiro reveals a softer, sweeter side to her voice on this album, too. It is a change of pace, so fans of earlier stuff may need a while to get used to it, but newcomers have nothing not to like. I mean, Thom Yorke's on the album, COULD it be bad? Still Drugstore, still great. No--they've gotten better. Here's hoping I don't have to wait so long for the next one."