Search - Dizzy Gillespie :: Have Trumpet Will Excite: Vme

Have Trumpet Will Excite: Vme
Dizzy Gillespie
Have Trumpet Will Excite: Vme
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Latin Music
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

Making its first (and long-overdue) appearance on CD, Have Trumpet, Will Excite! was recorded in February 1959 and arguably featured Gillespie's most underrated band. Bassist Sam Jones and drummer Lex Humphries formed a Ro...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Dizzy Gillespie
Title: Have Trumpet Will Excite: Vme
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Umvd Labels
Original Release Date: 1/1/1959
Re-Release Date: 6/19/2001
Album Type: Extra tracks, Original recording remastered
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Latin Music
Styles: Latin Jazz, Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 731454974424, 0731454974424

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Making its first (and long-overdue) appearance on CD, Have Trumpet, Will Excite! was recorded in February 1959 and arguably featured Gillespie's most underrated band. Bassist Sam Jones and drummer Lex Humphries formed a Rock-of-Gibraltar base over which pianist Junior Mance, at once subtle and blues drenched, created the ideal platform for the trumpeter and the remarkable Les Spann, who was equally original whether on flute or guitar. Spann proved an inspiring foil for Gillespie, and it is sad to reflect that he soon after faded from the scene, eventually to die in penury. With the exception of the leader's famous "Woody 'N' You," the material draws on the rich resources of the American popular song, and while all seven such cuts abound in imagination and excellent solos, the pick has to be "My Heart Belongs to Daddy," a glorious combination of power, wit, and melodiousness. Three previously unreleased alternative takes of "There Is No Greater Love" and two of "I Found A Million Dollar Baby" are included, which is nice; nicer still would have been the addition (there was room enough) of the companion album The Ebullient Mr. Gillespie, recorded at the same time. Nevertheless, you won't regret investing in one of the mature Gillespie's most satisfying dates. --Richard Palmer
 

CD Reviews

Cool, baby, cool
Michael St John | St. Paul, MN | 11/19/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This music sounds like a response to the "cool" jazz musicians who were all the rage in the late '50s. And why not? Diz broke up his great big band of '56-57 because it wasn't making money, and he must have taken a good look at the scene. Who was considered hip? Who was getting paid? Miles, Chet Baker, Gerry Mulligan, the MJQ, Brubeck.... Well, he could do anything those guys were doing. So how about showing those hipsters on campus what's what....Whatever his real intent, that's the context in which I hear the music. Listening to this album next to Gerry Mulligan's WHAT IS THERE TO SAY? (w/ Art Farmer), recorded at about the same time, reveals a strong similarity between what the two men were doing. Too bad Gerry didn't pull Dizzy into the studio with him, while he was recording one-off meetings with so many others. I think they could have had a great chemistry together.Anyway, this is a rather relaxed affair; Dizzy plays with a mute on several cuts, most of the tempos kept on a high simmer. The program is loaded with magnificently intricate playing; it's just that Diz doesn't explode like on usually expects. It's a series of *pop*pop*pop* instead of a great BANG! If you normally shy away from Dizzy because you think he's too hot, too busy, too much in the upper register, and you just aren't often in the mood for that (nobody wants to dis Diz, but I know many feel that way), then you might give this CD a try. His playing here is the very model of masterful control, restraint, and subtle charm.(Recorded February '59, with Junior Mance, Les Spann, Sam Jones, Carlos "Patato" Valdez, and Lex Humphries.)"