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Life
Dissecting Table
Life
Genres: Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock, Metal
 
  •  Track Listings (4) - Disc #1

Fans of industrial music in general and Japanese noise endeavors in particular, take note: the eighth release by Ichiro Tsuji's Dissecting Table is an extremely powerful aural onslaught that illustrates both ominous darkwa...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Dissecting Table
Title: Life
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Release
Original Release Date: 9/29/1998
Re-Release Date: 10/27/1998
Genres: Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock, Metal
Styles: Goth & Industrial, Alternative Metal
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 781676640126

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Fans of industrial music in general and Japanese noise endeavors in particular, take note: the eighth release by Ichiro Tsuji's Dissecting Table is an extremely powerful aural onslaught that illustrates both ominous darkwave sensibilities and nearly inhuman future shock. Life features four extended electronic compositions, and Tsuji's malevolent musical philosophy is a virtual soundtrack of intense alienation and industrial anarchy. Similar to that of noise bands like Merzbow, Dissecting Table's sonic assault produces a violent milieu that is furiously provocative and often disconcerting. Utilizing a subsonic low-end throb that is dense and threatening, Life is not for the faint of heart or the musically meek. Still, if the term beautiful noise has any meaning to your aesthetic tastes, this ravenous excursion into sound may provide some compelling moments. --Mitch Myers
 

CD Reviews

Supposedly chaotic, yet...
10/31/2002
(3 out of 5 stars)

"Beneath it all there is a certain structure, it's just too widely-spaced and complex to let most people understand what's going on. Harsh, almost random at times, angry bursts of beats, growling monotonous vocals [like death haiku], washes and waves of powerful drones, static, reverberating frequencies, cycled scorching layers of distortion, etc. It's Japanese industrial, you know what it sounds like. Every now and again a crack opens up beneath the layers of noise and you can hear (and see, in your mind's eye) a vast subterranean landscape rising and falling down below the ocean of electric pulses. You want to disappear into that world. Those moments make the whole thing worthwhile. But even on this surface this is a very entertaining work, and has enough changes and motion to keep noise fans distracted."