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MOOG: The Electric Eclectics Of Dick Hyman
Dick Hyman
MOOG: The Electric Eclectics Of Dick Hyman
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

Hyman may make his living playing Gershwin and Berlin on the piano, and composing the scores for Woody Allen's films, but his legacy will remember him as the goofy synthecist and organist on Enoch Light's trippy big band s...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Dick Hyman
Title: MOOG: The Electric Eclectics Of Dick Hyman
Members Wishing: 10
Total Copies: 0
Label: Varese Sarabande
Release Date: 5/13/1997
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Style: Easy Listening
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 030206578829

Synopsis

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Hyman may make his living playing Gershwin and Berlin on the piano, and composing the scores for Woody Allen's films, but his legacy will remember him as the goofy synthecist and organist on Enoch Light's trippy big band series for ABC's Command label during the 1960s. Moog contains that balance of lounge cheese and honest propulsion so desired by the kids nowadays. And the bonus cut of James Brown's "Give It Up or Turn It Loose" mixes Donald Duck sputtering with real funky-ass drums. Beastie Boy-types name-check Hyman whenever the opportunity arises. I wonder if he knows? --D. Strauss

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CD Reviews

Dick Hyman turns it loose on this one.
DJ Rix | NJ USA | 07/22/1999
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Anyone familiar with Hyman's recordings knows that this album is no throwaway. He was genuinely interested in what the Moog could do (just as he once made a credible LP based on the sound possibilities of a Lowery organ). This is good, clean fun. It's a tad too funky to be a "lounge" classic. The reason so many people love this CD is because it's so entertaining.Bob Rixon, WFMU-FM"
Fun stuff
BENJAMIN MILER | Veneta, Oregon | 06/17/2002
(4 out of 5 stars)

"From circa 1968 to 1972, there were a large string of albums played on Moog synthesizers. Many of them were versions of pop and classical songs played on that big modular beast. Most of this was pretty cheesy and dated, to say the least, but interesting. Walter (Wendy) Carlos' Switched-On Bach started it. And then you got albums like Gershon Kingsley's Music to Moog By, various other Kingsley albums, and albums from Frenchman Jean-Jacques Perrey (he also released a few albums with Kingsley as well). Not to mention Beaver & Krause. Pretty soon the Moog entered rock music. Simon & Garfunkle recorded "Save the Life of my Child" who I assume featured Paul Beaver on the Moog. The Beatles gave us Abbey Road in which several songs used the Moog. Then Emerson, Lake & Palmer really got serious with the Moog by going way overboard with Keith Emerson not only giving us the big Moog III-C, but several Minimoogs, and other assorted keyboards in his setup. But before that, some guy named Dick Hyman, who pioneered the use of the Lowrey organ released this album: Moog: The Electric Eclectics of Dick Hyman in 1969 on the ABC/Command label. The lunar module on the cover revealed that this album must have came out around the same time as the Apollo moon landing. Musically it's really cheesy, but that's what you expect from this kind of music. He also played the Lowrey organ. Although it's been a while since I heard this, the one stick out cut is "The Minotaur". Listen to this, and then listen to "Tank" off Emerson, Lake & Palmer's debut, and tell me that this particular cut did not have an influence on Keith Emerson's playing. A lot of the same synth sounds you hear on "The Minotaur", you hear on "Tank". Coicidence? While I don't say this album is a masterpiece, like many other Moog albums released from 1968-1972, this has its appeal and worth owning if you like this stuff."
The Unforgetable Moog
shanell papp | 12/18/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Wow I loved this album....I bought it on a whim at a garage sale (on tape) and it completed me. I listened to it all the time, got a portable tape player to play it for my friends....but some of them just didn't get it. At the time I was listening to Air and 1970's Boney M alot so this album was an excellent fit. I think you will like it if you love simple, fun and early electro music already. It is really a rare gem. Amazing"