Search - Dexter Gordon :: Settin the Pace

Settin the Pace
Dexter Gordon
Settin the Pace
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (23) - Disc #1

This CD gathers all of Dexter Gordon's recordings as a leader for Savoy, with one session each from 1945 and 1946 and two from December 1947. Gordon had already worked in the bands of Lionel Hampton, Louis Armstrong, and B...  more »

      
1

Larger Image
Listen to Samples

CD Details

All Artists: Dexter Gordon
Title: Settin the Pace
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Savoy Jazz
Release Date: 10/5/1999
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Style: Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 795041702722, 0795041702722

Synopsis

Amazon.com
This CD gathers all of Dexter Gordon's recordings as a leader for Savoy, with one session each from 1945 and 1946 and two from December 1947. Gordon had already worked in the bands of Lionel Hampton, Louis Armstrong, and Billy Eckstine, and he was among the very first players to adapt the innovations of Charlie Parker to the tenor saxophone, creating his own voice out of an amalgam of Parker and Lester Young. Gordon's sound was already his own, a harder-edged tenor sound with very little vibrato, and there's evidence as well of the striking harmonic imagination that would later influence John Coltrane. Ballads like "I Can't Escape from You" and "Dexter's Mood" show Gordon's romantic side, but it's the bop tunes that most clearly chart his rapid evolution. Two of bop's most brilliant--and doomed--players make substantial appearances here. Pianist Bud Powell is present on the eight takes from 1946, adding Tatum-esque filigree to the ballad and driving, incandescent play to the other tracks, prodding, testing, and usually exceeding the horns. Trumpeter Fats Navarro appears on the final session, along with composer-pianist Tadd Dameron, and it's once again apparent that he was Dizzy Gillespie's only serious rival among bop trumpeters. Whether it's the presence of a working band or growing maturity, Gordon is at his best on "Index" and "Dextivity," with a relaxed drive and full command of his substantial ideas. While most of the tracks are around three minutes--the compressed jolts of bop energy dictated by the limited playing time of the 78--"Settin' the Pace," originally divided over two sides, is nearly six minutes. It's a saxophone chase with baritonist Leo Parker, in the same vein that Gordon explored to great acclaim with Wardell Grey. The wealth of alternates includes several issued for the first time, among them tracks with Powell and Navarro. --Stuart Broomer

Similarly Requested CDs

 

CD Reviews

A Great Dexter Gordon CD!
M. Allen Greenbaum | California | 03/01/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Over 70 minutes of finely recorded bop and blues by tenorist extraordinaire Dexter Gordon. His full beautiful tone is both relaxing and exhilarating. These recordings are from 3 dates for Savoy in 1945-1947. (The CD notes that this is not a thorough collection of EVERY track cut for Savoy, alternative takes from two sessions are not included. Only Dexter "completists" should be concerned.)Of the 23 selections, 11 include either Max Roach or Art Blakey on drums. Fats Navarro brings his wonderfully rounded sound to six cuts recorded in 1947, and Tadd Dameron plays piano on eleven. What's surprising, however, is not the great playing of the jazz legends here, but the work of not as celebrated musicians such as Leo Parker on baritone sax and Sadik Hakim on piano. This is great bop playing which will get you moving!"
Your most revolutionary music comes young
H. Walters | Tribeca, NYC | 08/03/2003
(4 out of 5 stars)

"dexter had his share of problems -- drug arrests kept him out of circulation for 10 years, and he was celebrated for his comeback and his role in "'round midnight." but if you want his young, unvarnished, revolutionary sound, this is the place to go. young dexter is working through the fast, fresh changes of bebop on the tenor saxophone, at a pace that no one thought a horn deeper than an alto could handle. "long tall dexter" is a remake of charlie parker's "now's the time;" "i can't escape from you," is an uncommonly mature treatment of a ballad; "dexter digs in" -- all three takes -- is full of restless energy and power. for dexter, this is his armstrong's "hot fives," monk's blue note; bird's savoy and dial. it doesn't get 5 stars because i'm a tough grader."