Search - Dead Can Dance :: Aion

Aion
Dead Can Dance
Aion
Genres: Alternative Rock, World Music, Jazz, New Age, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

This 1990 release contains twelve songs written and produced by Brendan Perry and Lisa Gerrard, predominantly recorded in their own studio in southern Ireland.

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Dead Can Dance
Title: Aion
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: 4ad Records
Release Date: 11/18/2008
Genres: Alternative Rock, World Music, Jazz, New Age, Pop, Rock
Style: Indie & Lo-Fi
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 652637271027

Synopsis

Product Description
This 1990 release contains twelve songs written and produced by Brendan Perry and Lisa Gerrard, predominantly recorded in their own studio in southern Ireland.

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Member CD Reviews

Chris G.
Reviewed on 8/7/2006...
Has a High Renaissance flavor to it.

CD Reviews

Garden of Arcane Delights
Vic Future | State of Disrepair, NYC | 03/04/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"If you know DCD, you know how wonderfully literate and just spectacular their lyrics can be. This album is no different. It has "Black Sun" which I was blessed enough to see live in 06, and "Radharc", both stand the test of time. This is not a good "My first DCD" cd only because the music is very genre specific, and if you have never heard their stuff before you may get lost in the tangles of myth and legend. I'm sure some will disagree, but I don't find this album to be a good `get to know me' album - I suggest starting with DCD, "Into the Labyrinth" a sort of Best Of, without the corny-ness of being a Greatest Hits. It gives a wide breadth of styles and lets you hear all of the creamy goodness the band has offered up in the years gone by. Id say this album has a definate "Arabian flair" and not everyone is open to that. I however am a huge fan of World Music, and this is right up my crooked dimly lit alley.
BTW, when you see H. Bosch on the front cover of an album, you know its going to be good!"
Dead Can Dance does medieval
Eric Kelly | San Rafael, CA USA | 04/14/2007
(4 out of 5 stars)

"The cover of Aion (a detail from Bosch's Garden of Earthly Delights) provides a strong clue to the stylistic theme of this disc, Dead Can Dance's fifth album. With the exception of one track, the songs on this album are modern interpretations (often quite faithful) of medieval vocal and instrumental music. And therein lies the rub - if you dislike medieval or period music, you are likely to find the album slow and dull, whereas if you do like it, this may quickly become one of your favorite discs.

My own tastes fall somewhere in between the two extremes, with the result that I find my favorite tracks on the album are those where Dead Can Dance's Brendan Perry and Lisa Gerrard provide some interesting modern spin on the period sound. The brief opening track, The Arrival and the Reunion, offers a thrilling take on medieval choral singing, quickly followed by a reworking of a lively dance tune, Saltarello, which is performed on period instruments but features an added modern punch in the production that pushes it into the realm of greatness. The marvelous centerpiece to the album are Brendan's Fortune Presents Gifts and Lisa's As The Bell Rings. The former features a crystalline production of a traditional Spanish poem on the vagaries of fortune, delivered in Brendan's rich baritone over an atmospheric backdrop of lute and drone, while the latter combines a modern drum machine with period bagpipe and Lisa's marvelous singing.

A couple of the album tracks, Mephisto and The Garden of Zephyrus, are brief musical sketches which come and go without registering much of an impression. Of the more traditional medieval tracks, The Song of Sybil is stately and lovely, while The End of Words, Wilderness and The Promised Womb require a deeper love of traditional medieval music than I possess. The album closer, Radharc, punches up the tempo and explores some of the middle eastern influences in medieval music; it might not sound out of place blaring from a radio in Cairo.

The one oddball track on this album is Brendan's Black Sun. Though it is one of his best songs, it bears little resemblance stylistically to the rest of the album; its horns, plucked strings, and goth lyrics place it more in the genre of their previous albums, particularly Within The Realm of A Dying Sun. It doesn't exactly clash with the rest of the album, but it also doesn't fit very well either."