Search - Danilo Perez :: Motherland

Motherland
Danilo Perez
Motherland
Genres: World Music, Jazz, Pop, Latin Music
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

From his work with Dizzy Gillespie and Wynton Marsalis to his pioneering recordings including The Journey and PanaMonk, Panamanian pianist-composer Danilo Perez has evolved into one of the most complete musicians of his ge...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Danilo Perez
Title: Motherland
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Polygram Records
Original Release Date: 9/19/2000
Release Date: 9/19/2000
Genres: World Music, Jazz, Pop, Latin Music
Styles: Caribbean & Cuba, Cuba, Latin Jazz, Modern Postbebop, Bebop, Latin Pop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 731454390422, 0731454390422, 073145439042

Synopsis

Amazon.com
From his work with Dizzy Gillespie and Wynton Marsalis to his pioneering recordings including The Journey and PanaMonk, Panamanian pianist-composer Danilo Perez has evolved into one of the most complete musicians of his generation. This monumental CD is his most intricate and engaging to date. Perez's approach to the African musical imprint in the Americas, with its U.S., Caribbean, Central American, and South American branches, is the aural equivalent of a Gabriel Garcia Marquez novel steeped in the magical realisms of the Americas. In Perez's hands, national rhythms blend with jazz, folkloric, and classical musical forms and merge with his encyclopedic keyboard conception on acoustic and electric piano. He's backed by an all-world array of musicians including soprano and alto saxophonist Chris Potter, violinist Regina Carter, drummer Brian Blade, and bassist John Patitucci from the U.S.; trumpeter Diego Urcola from Argentina; and singer Claudia Acuna from Chile. Perez takes the listener on a tour: from the Latin blues of "Suite for the Americas, Parts 1 and 2," and Richard Bona's funky Afro-Brazilian basslines on "Pan Africa" to the choral, Cuban complexity of "Overture." The highlights of the CD are Perez's updates of "Panama Libre" and "Panama 2000" from his self-titled debut and The Journey. They show off his arranging genius, and highlight his new role as the Cultural Ambassador of Panama. --Eugene Holley Jr.

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CD Reviews

His best so far
04aac | Williamstown, MA USA | 10/30/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Motherland is Danilo Perez's best. He just seems to improve with every album. I thought he'd reached his zenith after his release of The Journey, then after Panamonk, then after Central Avenue. I'm happy to be wrong, yet again. As a panamanian, this record (and in fact all his records) strike a particular nationalistic vein. In this album, "Elegant Dance" was easy to recognize as a "punto", a popular dance back home. All his rhythms, techniques, improvisations, just scream "Latin". But they're also a universal code, accessible to anyone, from any nationality."
Personal Synthesis
04aac | 09/22/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Along the lines of Keith Jarrett's "Expectations" and Wayne Shorter albums like "Native Dancer", Danilo's latest is a sincere, personal synthesis of influences and experiences that crosses all genres. There need to be more albums like this that, instead of sticking stubbornly to one genre or jumping frantically among many, reflects Shorter's one-time definition of jazz: "no genre.""
The new path
01/12/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Motherland is a clear indication that jazz is about to change its path. Danilo Perez is quickly becoming the MIles Davis of this decade. As a fusion master, Danilo Perez has pushed the limits of jazz to new realms ; refreshening, intense but delicate, this album may become a landmark as to the direction jazz music will go from now on. I agree 100% with The new York Times Critic's choice as No.1 pick of the year 2000. On the other hand, the recent nomination to the Grammys on the Latin Jazz Category indicates that the Academy is not yet prepared to recognized this talented panamanian as master pianist/composer/arranger in the jazz genre ( without adjectives) . Its to hard to accept, coming from a latino, that he speaks the jazz language more fluently that most jazz pianists in the world. Watch for more to come from Danilo Perez in the near future."