Search - Cowboy Junkies :: Miles From Our Home [Edited Version]

Miles From Our Home [Edited Version]
Cowboy Junkies
Miles From Our Home [Edited Version]
Genres: Country, Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1

On their seventh album, the Cowboy Junkies hitch their pony to producer John Leckie (Radiohead, Verve) and inch closer toward the mainstream. As a result, Miles from Our Home's title track might be the group's most upbeat ...  more »

      
   
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CD Details

All Artists: Cowboy Junkies
Title: Miles From Our Home [Edited Version]
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 4
Label: Geffen Records
Original Release Date: 6/30/1998
Release Date: 6/30/1998
Album Type: Clean
Genres: Country, Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock
Styles: Americana, Adult Alternative
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 720642522929, 720642522943

Synopsis

Amazon.com
On their seventh album, the Cowboy Junkies hitch their pony to producer John Leckie (Radiohead, Verve) and inch closer toward the mainstream. As a result, Miles from Our Home's title track might be the group's most upbeat and infectious song ever. Unfortunately, it also means Miles is frequently too pretty and pleasant for its own good. Think more Sarah McLachlan, less Velvet Underground. Still, gloom reigns supreme. The atmospheric "Blue Guitar" and, presumably, the slow, shattered "At the End of the Rainbow" (a hidden track) mourn the late singer-songwriter and Junkie hero Townes Van Zandt. "Those Final Feet," a lilting, Band-like tune, marks the passing of the 94-year-old grandfather of the Timmins siblings, who comprise three fourths of the band. Translated through Margo Timmins's endlessly haunting vocals, such sentiments keep the Cowboy Junkies' cloudy mystique alive. --Neal Weiss

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CD Reviews

One minor flaw -- otherwise excellent
03/13/2000
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This was the first CJ album I had purchased, and it has led me to purchase just about everything they've recorded. It definitely has a fuller, more commercial sound than their other albums. Margo Timmins' voice is extraordinary regardless of the material. She could sing ANYTHING and it would be interesting. The one dud is "Someone Out There," in which the supreme being is referred to by the big "f" word in the unedited version and by what sounds like "booger" or "bugger" or something in the edited version. Anyway, it's a song which is certainly not unlistenable but is unworthy of the CJ. I'd probably just buy the unedited version -- the "f" word is probably less bothersome than whatever she's mumbling in its place. The rest of the album is excellent."
Excellent
10/31/1998
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I dont have the words to explain this. You just have to listen to it. And when you have listen to it once you want to listen to it again and after that you understand."