Search - Coup :: Kill My Landlord

Kill My Landlord
Coup
Kill My Landlord
Genres: Pop, Rap & Hip-Hop
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

The best socially conscious hip-hop album you probably never heard, The Coup's Kill My Landlord (originally released in 1993) was actually their second album, but the first released for wide distribution. Reflecting a blue...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Coup
Title: Kill My Landlord
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Wild Pitch Records
Original Release Date: 1/1/1993
Re-Release Date: 4/22/2008
Genres: Pop, Rap & Hip-Hop
Styles: Experimental Rap, Pop Rap
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 898842000599

Synopsis

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The best socially conscious hip-hop album you probably never heard, The Coup's Kill My Landlord (originally released in 1993) was actually their second album, but the first released for wide distribution. Reflecting a blue-collar hip-hop perspective rarely represented by the legions of hustlers, players, and gangstas clogging rap music, The Coup came instead talking about community activism ("I Know You"), self-love ("F*ck a Perm"), and revolution ("Dig It"). But unlike the didactic preachiness that sometimes infected the post-Public Enemy crowd, The Coup made messages to free your mind and body with funky licks and fresh rhymes courtesy of Boots, E-Roc, and DJ Pam the Funkstress. Too bad the masses were too caught up in the G-funk era to give 'em credit the first time through. --Oliver Wang

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CD Reviews

One of the best.
08/01/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Whenever I listen to this album, I think "This is the funkiest stuff ever." Boots creates irresistably groovy compositions that rely on no more than a live bass line, some drums, and some on-point piano stabs. If this album was simply instrumental, I'd buy it. But the lyrics are as impressive as the music. Boots' lazy drawl only makes his biting social commentary stand out more, as it's obvious he's fed up with society and ready for revolution. Throw in the competant E-Roc and the aptly named Pam the Funkstress, and you have an all-time, unknown hip-hop classic. Wild Pitch was such a great record label."
Absolute Classic - Get this for yourself, please.
James Roche | Seattle, WA United States | 03/03/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is the slickest hip-hop record I own. The rhymes are so smooth, they leave you singing all day. The commentary is beyond astute. Biting apathetic accounts of life flow from someone who seems to understand the reasons for the destitution of a people at the hands of a mindless machine. The essential drive to this group is the analysis of desparation. Their dramatization of destructive behavior in poor culture cuts to the very core of its nature. Each song paints a different picture of what authority, meaning drugs, jobs, government and economics, have to do with the situation that they see in their hometown of Oakland. The album was released in the season prior to the LA/Rodney King riots, and the applicable philosophy hits you like a stone. The name of the album itself, and the final song on the album (which is absolutely excellent by the way) is pulled from a very depressing metaphor that sums up the rest of the work as a whole. I'll leave the rest of my admiration and respect for this group for the rest of you to discover."