Search - Christian Marclay :: More Encores: Christian Marclay Plays With the Records Of...

More Encores: Christian Marclay Plays With the Records Of...
Christian Marclay
More Encores: Christian Marclay Plays With the Records Of...
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Jazz, Special Interest, Pop, Rap & Hip-Hop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1


      
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All Artists: Christian Marclay
Title: More Encores: Christian Marclay Plays With the Records Of...
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Recommended Records
Original Release Date: 1/1/2004
Re-Release Date: 10/21/1997
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Jazz, Special Interest, Pop, Rap & Hip-Hop, Rock
Styles: Turntablists, Avant Garde & Free Jazz, Experimental Music
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 752725008327

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CD Reviews

A plunderphonic vinyl collage masterpiece.
scott | Buffalo, NY | 06/01/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Avant/Experimental turntable master Christian Marclay's (who is also a contemprary artist) "More Encores" was originally released as a 10" vinyl record on the No Man's Land label(Germany) in 1988. It's composed entirely of records after whom each track is titled. In performance, he mixes records of almost any genre on up to 8 turntables, fragmenting, repeating, altering speeds, playing them backwards, & breaking them in front of mics. "John Cage" is a collage made by cutting slices from several records and gluing them back together into a single disc, and a hand-crank gramophone was used in "Louis Armstrong". In all other places the records were mixed and manipulated on multiple turntables and recorded analog with the use of overdubbing. For years now Marclay along with fellow turntable terrorist Otomo Yoshihide have been a great breath of "fresh air" with the ongoing flood of dull one dimensional hip-hop & electronic music DJ's..."
Great Album
Adam S. | st. louis, missouri United States | 04/10/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This was the first record made up entirely of samples. Each song uses only records by a paticular artist from which the song gets its name. On beautiful piece on genius entitled "Jane Birken and Serge Gainsbourg" he takes someone saying "yesterday" and somone saying "no" and manipulates it so it sounds like "say yes...no". But some of the longer unmanipulated samples are a little puff daddy-esque such as on "Johann Struass.This record was way ahead of its time and still is. Buy it."