Search - Charles Lloyd :: Just Before Sunrise: Dream Weaver & Love in

Just Before Sunrise: Dream Weaver & Love in
Charles Lloyd
Just Before Sunrise: Dream Weaver & Love in
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (5) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (7) - Disc #2

Until this CD, the only in-print evidence of saxophonist-flutist Charles Lloyd's remarkably successful string of late-'60s albums has been Forest Flower, the 1966 live recording from the Monterey Jazz Festival. But that ha...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Charles Lloyd
Title: Just Before Sunrise: Dream Weaver & Love in
Members Wishing: 4
Total Copies: 0
Label: 32. Jazz Records
Original Release Date: 4/6/1999
Release Date: 4/6/1999
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Styles: Smooth Jazz, Bebop
Number of Discs: 2
SwapaCD Credits: 2
UPC: 604123211727

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Until this CD, the only in-print evidence of saxophonist-flutist Charles Lloyd's remarkably successful string of late-'60s albums has been Forest Flower, the 1966 live recording from the Monterey Jazz Festival. But that has thankfully changed with the release by 32 Jazz of Just Before Sunrise, which bundles together two long out-of-print albums from that period, Dream Weaver from 1966 and Love In from 1967. Featuring pianist Keith Jarrett and drummer Jack DeJohnette, with bassists Cecil McBee on Dream Weaver and Ron McClure on Love In, the two albums give a fuller picture of what was undoubtedly one of jazz's most remarkable ensembles. Lloyd's playing was so impassioned and direct it isn't hard to see why many critics at the time pegged him as the next Coltrane. His beautiful flute work on Dream Weaver's "Autumn Sequence" (which adds intro and outro passages to the classic "Autumn Leaves") is one of the best examples of jazz flute available, and his tenor playing on the disc's two-part title track and the uptempo ode to Charlie Parker, "Bird Flight," is searing. But it was the quartet's explosive group interaction (largely due to the incredible DeJohnette) that became its trademark. Dream Weaver in particular is a case study in sensitive group improvisation, with the Quartet's hard-bop leanings balanced by an expansive freedom more akin to Miles Davis's quintet of the same period and to the classic John Coltrane Quartet. Love In (recorded live at the Fillmore) shows more evidence of the group's crossover status, with a lifeless version of the Beatles' "Here, There and Everywhere" sounding like a token gesture. But both albums are remarkable in that they were embraced by a pop audience and yet, decades later, still sound so raw and uncompromising. --Ezra Gale
 

CD Reviews

Jazz that turned on the Grateful Dead
Dr.D.Treharne | Exeter, Devon, United Kingdom | 06/22/2000
(4 out of 5 stars)

"A welcome re-issue for two albums from the group that are supposed to have turned the Grateful Dead on to jazz.In some ways a strange pairing,"Dream Weaver" being the quartets first Atlantic recording,and "Love In" a live recording of a different line-up. However three of the four in the band remain constant and its clear to see why Lloyd, Keith Jarrett and Jack de Johnette were so highly regarded.Jarrett in particular sprays the albums with amazing piano phrases and DeJohnette was equally inventive on drums. Many of the tracks from "Dream Weaver" have been available on Atlantic samplers, but it's an album that demands to be heard in full. "Love In" contains more extended moments, particularly "Memphis Dues again/Island Blue". It also features what was a regular part of their live act, a Beatles tune, in this case "Here there and everywhere". What is evident in the pairing is the enormous energy and enthusiasm that drove the band into extended experimentation, and made them so popular. If you're coming to these albums from Lloyd's more recent ECM albums you may find it rather frenetic, but for all us old hippies "it's good to have the both of you back""