Search - Can :: Future Days

Future Days
Can
Future Days
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Alternative Rock, World Music, Special Interest, New Age, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (4) - Disc #1

2008 digitally remastered SACD hybrid reissue of the German avant garde/Krautrock act's album, originally released in 1973. Features sleeve notes, rare photos and reproductions of original artwork from long-deleted editio...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Can
Title: Future Days
Members Wishing: 12
Total Copies: 0
Label: Mute U.S.
Original Release Date: 1/1/2008
Re-Release Date: 4/15/2008
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Alternative Rock, World Music, Special Interest, New Age, Pop, Rock
Styles: Electronica, Europe, Continental Europe, Experimental Music, Progressive, Progressive Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 724596938522

Synopsis

Album Description
2008 digitally remastered SACD hybrid reissue of the German avant garde/Krautrock act's album, originally released in 1973. Features sleeve notes, rare photos and reproductions of original artwork from long-deleted editions. Mute.

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CD Reviews

Timeless Beauty and Drive
Tilman | New York, USA | 11/29/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Two tracks on this record are, for me, absolutely essential CAN: The proto-ambient, latin groove of Future Days and the in-your-face drive of Moonshake. While Splash offers an undercurrent of tension and unease, Bel-Air just sings with light. For Damo Suzuki, this was already becoming too symphonic and the album marked his final recording--completing the trio of CAN's most enduring classics. Like CAN's other great material, the recordings are devoid of fashion and impossible to date. They sounds as fresh as the day this music was born (and meticulously hand-edited = spliced with razorblades and tape by Holger Czukay) and hold up to anything from any era. Get it. This may be the best ten bucks you'll ever spend in your life."
Shake the moon
Tom Chase | London | 12/28/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

""Future Days", the last of Can's golden era trilogy, is possibly the most ambitious and wildly innovative of the three. It expands on the psych-funk of "Ege Bamyasi" through elegant, vast electronic soundscapes that give an ethereal and haunting atmosphere. It's electronic, but don't be thinking Jean Michel Jarre or Kraftwerk - it's still undeniably Can.

The evolving sound of "Future Days" is evident from the go with the superb opening title track. Layers of texture and noise build until giving way to a sublime, delicate groove, decorated with guitar flashes and lush synth washes. "Spray" offers more experimentation with some frenetic, jazzy instrumentation that swaggers and bulges, builds up and breaks down. "Moonshake" is most reminiscent of the Can sound found on their previous works - by far the shortest and sharpest track on the album, the song is full-on funky Can at their catchy and accessible best.

The centre-piece to the album though comes with the giant twenty minute "Bel Air". The opening five minutes is some of the most beautiful music to pass my ears, anchored by an ethereal, haunting base line, the song then weaves in and out of structures, always shifting dynamics and textures. At times starkly minimal with gentle guitar and synth work, at others energetic, dense and percussion laden. It's a triumph to the band.

Unlike so many bands from the 70s that dabbled in electronic outings, Can's music still sounds fresh and exciting today. This is one of the most important and influential albums to come out of the krautrock and 70s rock scene. Highly recommended to everyone."
No title
Bill Your 'Free Form FM Handi Cyber | Mahwah, NJ USA | 04/10/2009
(4 out of 5 stars)

"It is intersting to me that many Can fans feel the albums after Ege Bysami are the best. You can make a great argument for this: Starting on Future Days, Can dispensed with a lot of the avant gaurde noise and possessed craziness Damo brought to Tago Mago and Ege. What emerged was a thinner, funkier music, using tropical and African beats. Damo-who left after this album- is mixed WAY back on Future Days

I like the record, and see this more refined approach as a viable direction. But, to me, Can's sound retracted at this point, and became SLIGHLY less interesting. Even the mixes are less intricate. The vocals are run through filters, and I really miss Damo's dominating presence. I also don't understand entirely why Can decided to drop their avant influcnes and emphasize the funk entirely

Still, this is far above average progressive dance music, which I will listen to many more times. I only think it less relative to earlier Can, but I supposed this is a matter of subjective taste, not inharent musical quality,."