Search - Dietrich Buxtehude, Rene Saorgin :: Buxtehude: L'Oeuvre D'Orgue [Complete Organ Works]

Buxtehude: L'Oeuvre D'Orgue [Complete Organ Works]
Dietrich Buxtehude, Rene Saorgin
Buxtehude: L'Oeuvre D'Orgue [Complete Organ Works]
Genres: Special Interest, Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (17) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (19) - Disc #2
  •  Track Listings (19) - Disc #3
  •  Track Listings (16) - Disc #4
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #5

Buxtehude was employed by the German town of Lubeck, and so great was his fame as both a performer and a composer that Bach walked something like a 100 miles to go and hear him. The job as Buxtehude's successor was the m...  more »

      
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Amazon.com
Buxtehude was employed by the German town of Lubeck, and so great was his fame as both a performer and a composer that Bach walked something like a 100 miles to go and hear him. The job as Buxtehude's successor was the most coveted in Germany, and Bach, Handel, and Telemann reportedly all auditioned for the post. Why didn't they take the job? Well, there was a catch. The lucky candidate had to marry Buxtehude's oldest daughter, who was, to put it mildly, past her prime. So the three greatest German Baroque composers all passed on the position, and the rest is history. This complete set of organ works at a special price is a great reminder of a highly entertaining chapter in music history, and it's fine listening too. --David Hurwitz
 

CD Reviews

Good stuff, here
David M. Schnute | 02/04/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is a wonderful set. Nice, well-mannered playing (not as idiosyncratic as Ton Koopman) that lets the music and the instruments speak for themselves. And such instruments - historic organs from three different countries, each as different as their origins and locations. The reeds in the Alesheim organ are absolutely erotic! Buxtehude wrote some extrordinary music - the man must have had a sense of humanity and the humor that comes with it. A minor deficiency in the Amazon listings is omission of the organs, locations & builders -- for organ music as important as performers. Ergo --Disk 1 & 2: St. Laurenkerk, Alkmmar (Netherlands) Various buiders from 1639. Disk 2: St. Nikolaus, Altenbruch (France) Various builders from 1497. Disk 3 & 4: Groote Kert, Zwolle (Netherlands) Arp Schnitger and son Frans Caspar (1718-1721) Disk 4 & 5: Domkirche, Arlesheim (Switzwerland) Johan Andreas Silberman, 1761"
A great set and a deal
David M. Schnute | 03/06/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I love this set! I orignially purchased it out of curiousity (so why the heck DID the young Bach walk 100 miles to hear this guy anyway?) and because it was inexpensive. Well, in my opinion they could charge double the price, and the set would be worth it! Admittedly, these are somewhat old analog recordings, but they sound great. And Rene Saorgin's performances on period organs are terrific. But it's the music itself that's the real draw here: Truly wonderful stuff! Even if you find organ music intimidating or unappealing (I once felt that way myself) this could change your mind. It's inspiring, joyful, profound (ok, it's not Bach, but so what?), fascinating, beautiful music! Perhaps an essential recording for fugue fans. And, by gosh -- look at the price. They're practically giving these CDs away !"
Get 'em while they last
Nobody | in particular | 01/11/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This CD release of Buxethude's work was recorded in the late 1960s, and being on a rather obscure foreign label may not remain in print forever. So, get a set now while they last.I purchased a used set which arrived without liner notes. It is unclear whether this is because the liner notes were lost by the prior owner or because no liner notes are included by the publisher. In any case, I have nothing to go on for this review other than what I can hear as I listen to the CDs.Buxtehude's music is best served by careful, contemplative, competent console work on a straightforward instrument. These recordings provide exactly this. Saorgin's style of playing is unhurried and conservative, and does not seek to add anything to the music beyond the composer's intent.The interplay of the organs, the churches where they are located, and the method of recording overall results in a basic, honest presentation of the music. No gratuitous use of fancy stops and no emphasis of any echoy qualities of the churches. And that's good, because Buxtehude being an early baroque composer, these sort of frills would be out of place. Yet, registration is varied from one work to the next, and the relative handful of more dramtic works are treated accordingly.The technical quality of the recording is very good despite its being made in the 1960s. Clearly the equipment used was state of the art for its day, as there is no noise or other artifacts to distract from the music.I suppose I should mark this down from 5 stars to 4 for the lack of liner notes. But then again, if you have serious enough interest in this material to buy a set such as this, you probably already know as much about the music as the liner notes are likely to provide."