Search - Bruce Robison :: It Came from San Antonio

It Came from San Antonio
Bruce Robison
It Came from San Antonio
Genres: Country, Alternative Rock, Folk, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (7) - Disc #1

From the childlike collage on the cover to the silly title to the short length, Bruce Robison's fourth album looks to be his slightest. But look and listen again. The pleasure that he and his steady Austin band--featuring ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Bruce Robison
Title: It Came from San Antonio
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Premium Records
Original Release Date: 1/1/2007
Re-Release Date: 5/15/2007
Genres: Country, Alternative Rock, Folk, Pop, Rock
Styles: Americana, Outlaw Country, Country Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 634457187320

Synopsis

Amazon.com
From the childlike collage on the cover to the silly title to the short length, Bruce Robison's fourth album looks to be his slightest. But look and listen again. The pleasure that he and his steady Austin band--featuring a grip-tight rhythm section of George Reiff and Eddie Cantu and the twangy garage flair of guitarist Andrew Nafziger--take in playing together only underscores how they serve an unfalteringly strong, varied set of Robison originals. Opening with the roller-rink, go-go bop of the title track, an homage to the Sir Douglas Quintet, Robison sounds loose and alive. He sinks his soul into detailed family memories and travels on "When It Rains," a story song as wise and engrossing as any Guy Clark epic, while "My Baby Now," with its piano, strings, and Southern melancholy, sounds like a lost Randy Newman ballad. His catchiest tune, "Lifeline," with grand pop chorus, skipping rhythm, and harmonies from wife Kelly Willis, sounds like a future hit for a more glamorous country star. The band stretches out on "Anywhere But Here," rising through a good guitar and mandolin groove and then quietly closing the album with "23A," a love letter to those simple, enduring songs of "love and hope, laughter and tears," the kind passed around at the end of a long honky-tonk night. No songwriter working the borders of country and Americana writes them better than Robison. --Roy Kasten

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CD Reviews

A shorter, though excellent, Robison record
DanD | 05/30/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Bruce Robison is one of those few songwriters who can take a simple lyric and make it profound. His voise is smooth, his style laid-back but intimate...his records flow like honey, although are usually more bitter than sweet; for, although they sound relaxed, Robison's songs usually deal with the darker side of life--heartaches, alcohol, homelessness, whatever gets you down.

IT CAME FROM SAN ANTONIO is another great Robison record; it's significantly shorter (only seven songs; we definitely would have prefered more material, but we'll deal with what we're dealt). The rollickin' title track kicks the set off; the rest is mostly mid-tempo balladry, though it never seems dull; Robison's lyrics keep your ears rivetted, waiting for the next bit of wisdom ("I thought I knew trouble, but the Devil laughed at me"). Bruce Robison is a songwriter's songwriter; the fact that he hasn't become a huge success yet speaks volumes about radio's failure to recognize true musical talent. He's had hits as a songwriter (George Strait's "Desperately" and "Wrapped," Dixie Chick's "Travellin' Soldier," Tim McGraw's "Angry All the Time") but has yet to gain recognition on his own. One of these days, he will; until then, we can sit back and listen to one of the best kept secrets in country music."