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Tokyo Tapes: Live
Brothers Four
Tokyo Tapes: Live
Genres: Folk, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #2

This double-CD from Washington State's legendary Brothers Four captures the group doing what they do best: performing on stage. Recorded live in Tokyo over the course of two days in 1996, the celebrated folk group, whose h...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Brothers Four
Title: Tokyo Tapes: Live
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Folk Era Records
Original Release Date: 3/4/1997
Re-Release Date: 3/11/1997
Genres: Folk, Pop
Style: Traditional Folk
Number of Discs: 2
SwapaCD Credits: 2
UPCs: 045507143522, 045507401325

Synopsis

Amazon.com
This double-CD from Washington State's legendary Brothers Four captures the group doing what they do best: performing on stage. Recorded live in Tokyo over the course of two days in 1996, the celebrated folk group, whose heyday was in the late 1950s and early '60s, spiritedly perform classics, a few somber ballads, and no fewer than five medleys (the best being the Man of La Mancha synopsis and the patriotic "American Medley"). Though it's a live recording, the Japanese audience at this hootenanny remains respectful and the sound quality is superb. Whether it's bluegrass ("Whiskey in the Jar"), Gordon Lightfoot's "Early Morning Rain" or the moving "Seven Daffodils," the Brothers Four prove that they belong in the forefront of the wholesome folk movement, where harmonies and a positive message are valued over controversial politics and self-righteousness. --Jason Verlinde

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CD Reviews

Brothers Four shine in Japan
F. Barton | Newport, WA USA | 12/18/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This 2cd set is probably the best work ever put out by the Brothers Four. They started out BIG in Japan, and are now still very big in Japan. The sound quality is superb, making you feel entirely surrounded by the distinctive sound of their voices. The beautiful ballads, like "Seven Dafodils" and "500 Miles" are hypnotic, and the medleys are tremendous. Their talent really comes to a fruition on this recording as their singing and playing of instruments has never been better. Inside is probably the best fan letter any group or artist could want."
The Brothers Four do a music tour of Sixties folk music
Lawrance M. Bernabo | The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota | 08/21/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

""The Tokyo Tapes" is a 1996 concert recording of the Brothers Four, the folk group that first emerged at the end of the 1950s. Although they were often dismissed as an imitation Kingston Trio, the Brothers Four were actually singing professionally before the more famous folk group. Actually, they were fraternity brothers at Phi Gamma Delta at the University of Washington and a practical joker at another fraternity had a girl call them up to convince the boys they had an audition at a Seattle club, the Colony Club. The owner ended up letting them sing and they ended up with a gig that lasted about a year while they honed their vocal style and got paid off in free beer (great story, huh?). Now only two of the original quartet remain, Bob Flick and John Paine, joined by Terry Lauber and Mark Pearson (who does most of the arranging), which explains why you will not find a whole lot of overlap between these songs and what the Brothers Four recorded on their live recordings from the early 1960s. You will find their two biggest "hits," with "The Green Leaves of Summer" and "Greenfields," but also a lot of other folk hits from that period, such as "Where Have All the Flowers Gone," "500 Miles," "Scarlet Ribbons," and "Michael Row the Boat Ashore." My favorite parts are the medleys, especially the first one, "The Railroad Medley," which brings together "City of New Orleans," "Wabash Cannonball," "This Train," and "Rock Island Line." There is also a "Bluegrass Medley" (which includes "Foggy Mountain Breakdown," "Will the Circle Be Unbroken" and "Darlin' Corey"), a "Man of La Mancha Medley," "American Medley," "Calypso Medley," and even an "Old-Time Banjo Medley." The result is that this 2-disc album has a lot more songs than the 24 tracks you will find here. The chief attraction of "The Tokyo Tapes" is that these songs come from all of the great folk artists of the period, from Woody Guthrie, Gordon Lightfoot, and Bob Dylan to the Weavers, the Kingston Trio, and Peter, Paul & Mary. Since hearing a song by one of these artists tends to put you in the mood to hear some songs by some of the others, this works out pretty well. This is a wonderful folk music concert album. I wish I had stumbled across it earlier."