Search - Johannes Brahms, Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky, Fritz Reiner :: Brahms; Tchaikovsky: Violin Concertos

Brahms; Tchaikovsky: Violin Concertos
Johannes Brahms, Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky, Fritz Reiner
Brahms; Tchaikovsky: Violin Concertos
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (6) - Disc #1

This recording was one for the record books from the day it was made. There's an absolutely terrible 1940s movie called Carnegie Hall about a woman who works at the hall as an usher after the death of her drunken husband...  more »

      
   
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CD Details

All Artists: Johannes Brahms, Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky, Fritz Reiner, Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Title: Brahms; Tchaikovsky: Violin Concertos
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 1
Label: RCA
Original Release Date: 1/1/1955
Re-Release Date: 3/9/1993
Album Type: Original recording remastered
Genre: Classical
Styles: Forms & Genres, Concertos, Historical Periods, Modern, 20th, & 21st Century, Romantic (c.1820-1910), Instruments, Strings
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 090266149520

Synopsis

Amazon.com
This recording was one for the record books from the day it was made. There's an absolutely terrible 1940s movie called Carnegie Hall about a woman who works at the hall as an usher after the death of her drunken husband, supporting her young, musically talented son. She wants him to be a great classical artist, and he wants to play (gasp!) jazz. There are a million star turns by great musicians here, and two of them are Jascha Heifetz and Fritz Reiner, so you actually see them together. Reiner wears his habitual scowl, while Heifetz is coldly aristocratic; in fact, they look totally miserable. But what music they make! Thank God we can't see them on CD, and only have the incredible sound that they have left behind. --David Hurwitz

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CD Reviews

The best of both
01/17/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is absolutely a desert island disc. Reiner might be the most under-rated conductor of his generation, and his conception of the great sweep of the Brahms concerto is unparalleled. And Heifetz? He's probably the greatest virtuoso of the recording era. His playing on the Tchaikovsky is other-worldy. It's almost impossible to believe that a human can play with such utter facility. The recording sound is excellent, with Heifetz way, way forward. Here are two of the Big Six concerti on the same disc by the greatest fiddler we've evr heard. A no-brainer. Buy it."
5 stars is no justice for this CD
nderrick | Holland, Michigan United States | 06/29/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Amazing. As a violinst, when I listen to this CD I am amazed every time at the skill of the master Heifetz. Some say he is cold. This is a lie. This rumor started among those who were hurt By Heifetz's sucess. People said that he was cold because he didn't move on stage, and that he didn't alter the tempo during play. Those who started that rumor were looking at it the wrong way. If they would have just closed their eyes and listened, they would have heard the warm tones, stunning emotion and incredible virtosity of Heifetz. Anyone who says the tempo is too fast must be too slow a thinker, because any lesser tempo would defeat the pourpose of the pieces. A Concerto is written to show off the ability of the violinst, so the faster the tempo the better. By generating that warm passion at that tempo shows how Heifetz was a leauge above everyone else. If only he and paganini could have competed, it would have been close.In living stereo this CD is the best recording of two amazing concertosBuy it, any onther CD is a waste of money"
Consummate Heifetz demands space on your shelf
David Kim | High Point, NC | 01/10/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Although my favorite recording of Tchaikovsky's violin concerto is David Oistrakh with Ormandy, Heifetz's superhuman technique is something marvelous to behold. Besides that, Heifetz adds a few embellishments of his own to the first movement, so that for those who like to compare different performances, this one will be pleasantly surprising.

Heifetz's performance of Brahms concerto is, likewise, consummate. However, I have heard some violinists legitimately complain about the speed with which Mr. Heifetz plays; it doesn't feel entirely appropriate to the first movement of Brahms. On the other hand, one could find it refreshing and full of momentum. Heifetz isn't mechanical, certainly, and the Brahms second movement and third movements should amply prove that assertion."