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Bach: The Well-Tempered Clavier 1 & 2
Johann Sebastian Bach, Rosalyn Tureck
Bach: The Well-Tempered Clavier 1 & 2
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (28) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (28) - Disc #2
  •  Track Listings (20) - Disc #3
  •  Track Listings (20) - Disc #4

This is the sort of set you start keeping score on, as positive and negative factors occur. The 1953 mono recording sounds every year of its age, so at four CDs for the price of three it's not a great bargain. Tureck write...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Johann Sebastian Bach, Rosalyn Tureck
Title: Bach: The Well-Tempered Clavier 1 & 2
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Deutsche Grammophon
Release Date: 2/8/2000
Album Type: Box set
Genre: Classical
Styles: Chamber Music, Forms & Genres, Improvisation, Historical Periods, Baroque (c.1600-1750), Classical (c.1770-1830)
Number of Discs: 4
SwapaCD Credits: 4
UPC: 028946330524

Synopsis

Amazon.com essential recording
This is the sort of set you start keeping score on, as positive and negative factors occur. The 1953 mono recording sounds every year of its age, so at four CDs for the price of three it's not a great bargain. Tureck writes at length in the booklet about her style of Bach playing and how it has changed over half a century, but she still endorses these performances. The listeners who respond best to them will probably be those hankering for the good old days when we didn't worry too much about issues of Baroque style. Tureck plays clearly and uses some proper ornaments, but she often romanticizes the music with slow tempos and extremes of dynamics. For every fugue she nails (like No. 12 in Book I) there are several that seem distended by modern standards. Even without the sparkling Feltsman edition for MusicMasters (recently deleted), there are several piano performances of the WTC available that will suit most tastes better, including the provocative and sometimes crazy Gould and the relatively straightforward Schiff. --Leslie Gerber
 

CD Reviews

Tureck - Bach's 48
Barry De Boer | Huddersfield, West Yorkshire United Kingdom | 04/12/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I was brought up on Tureck's Well-Tempered Clavier and have eagerly awaited this CD issue ever since CDs were invented. I am not disappointed. The tempi are occasionally slower than some modern performances (Schiff, et al)but the crystal clarity and articulation is amazing. Listen to the B-flat Fugue (No 17) in book 1 and marvel at the way the different voices are brought-out. By comparison Schiff seems unsubtle and Gould sounds (to me) crude. Is Tureck true to baroque style? Who knows. This collection is pure music at the very highest level - not a history book! The recording is not wonderful by today's standards but more than adequate once you have got used to the tape hiss. For me, this edition is definitive."
Tureck: Well-Tempered Clavier by Bach
Charles J. Haugnhey | Kensington, MD United States | 10/25/2000
(3 out of 5 stars)

"This remastering of a 1953 DG recording is a treasure in that it captures one of the 20th century's Bach specialists at her prime. For Tureck or Bach groupies, this 4-CD release is perhaps a must-have. But, for the hiss... at some tracks a faint whisper and on other tracks a veritable steam leak. Outside of pirate recordings of that era, I've heard no other early 50's remastering with so much intrusive noise. The amount of hiss surprised me, particularly since this source came from an established, presigious recording compny. As for the liner notes, the proof is left to most American students, since the text is only in French and German. So, Ms. Tureck gets a "5" for her artistry and love of Bach, and Deutsche Grammaphone gets a "1" for an inconsistent technical recording, for an overall "3.""
Spiritual
Carlos Rosa | Dallas, Texas | 06/28/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Yes, there is tape hiss, but it's unobtrusive and should not hinder the musical appreciation of any true Bachian. As to tempi, Tureck has a feel for expressing the timeless quality of the WTC, and at her most successful, tempo concerns dissolve. Go to Gould for pianistic virtuosity and an ego that sometimes bruises phrases, other times lifts them to heights of expressive potential; to Fischer (on Naxos) for the personality, the character of each prelude and fugue; to Hewitt for dynamics of almost Lisztian vibrancy, and to Schiff if you want bland, generic vanilla Bach. But if you want your WTC to approach something of the spirtuality and depth of the Matthew Passion or the B-Minor Mass, go with Tureck. She invests every fiber of her apparently reverent soul into each note, a performance which the light of heart can confuse with ponderousness. In short, Tureck's WTC is a must for those who must have their Bach mean as well as say something. For them, considerations such as tape hiss are trivial."