Search - Peter Kooij, Johann Sebastian Bach, Yoshikazu Mera :: Bach: Cantatas, Vol 8 (BWV 22, 23, 75) /Bach Collegium Japan * Suzuki

Bach: Cantatas, Vol 8 (BWV 22, 23, 75) /Bach Collegium Japan * Suzuki
Peter Kooij, Johann Sebastian Bach, Yoshikazu Mera
Bach: Cantatas, Vol 8 (BWV 22, 23, 75) /Bach Collegium Japan * Suzuki
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (23) - Disc #1

Volume 8 of the Bach Collegium Japan's survey of Bach's cantatas covers the composer's arrival in Leipzig to take the post of music director at the Thomaskirche. The two short cantatas BWV 22, Jesus nahm zu sich die Zwölfe...  more »

      
?

Larger Image

CD Details


Synopsis

Amazon.com
Volume 8 of the Bach Collegium Japan's survey of Bach's cantatas covers the composer's arrival in Leipzig to take the post of music director at the Thomaskirche. The two short cantatas BWV 22, Jesus nahm zu sich die Zwölfe, and BWV 23, Du wahrer Gott und Davids Sohn, were Bach's final audition pieces for the position; they were evidently performed as a pair--one before the sermon, one afterward. Each begins with a duet with obbligato oboe, each has a predominantly prayerful tone with minor-key music, yet both include some lilting triple-time dance rhythms in the arias; the chorale melody settings are more elaborate than usual in Bach cantatas, incorporating extensive instrumental interludes. BWV 75, Die Elenden soll essen, Bach's first cantata composed in his new job, is a bipartite work (something like BWV 22 and 23 together), which progresses from minor-key seriousness (with some terrific dissonant suspensions in the opening chorus) to major-key bliss (including a bass aria with a glorious part for obbligato trumpet). Soprano Midori Suzuki and countertenor Yoshikazu Mera have boyish voices that won't be to everyone's taste, but their technique and delivery are secure; tenor Gerd Türk and bass Peter Kooy are among the best Bach singers working today and perform at their usual high standard. As does the Bach Collegium Japan--Masaaki Suzuki's chorus and orchestra are treasures. --Matthew Westphal