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Andy Pratt
Andy Pratt
Andy Pratt
Genres: Folk, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #1

Japanese exclusive reissue of the critically acclaimed singer/songwriter's 1973 album for Epic/Columbia. 11 tracks including the classic, 'Avenging Annie' & 'Inside Me Wants Out'.

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Andy Pratt
Title: Andy Pratt
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Sony / Bmg Japan
Release Date: 3/20/2002
Album Type: Import
Genres: Folk, Pop, Rock
Styles: Singer-Songwriters, Soft Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1

Synopsis

Album Description
Japanese exclusive reissue of the critically acclaimed singer/songwriter's 1973 album for Epic/Columbia. 11 tracks including the classic, 'Avenging Annie' & 'Inside Me Wants Out'.

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CD Reviews

Enjoyable pop rock from a guy who should have made it big
Elliot Knapp | Seattle, Washington United States | 01/12/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Andy Pratt's self-titled second album is one of those lost treasures--he's got a great pop sensibility, vocal talents that range far, and instrumental prowess that makes for a really diverse stylistic and instrumental outing.

The first track is Andy's most well-known song, "Avenging Annie." It's propulsive piano rock with a really rocking chorus. Pratt's voice ranges from soulful to Bee-Gee-like falsetto (doesn't really bother me as much as some critics have claimed). Overall it's a great, solid start to an album that actually lives up to the example the single sets. "Inside Me Wants Out" is the first of many incredibly introspective, emotionally up-front songs on the album. Pratt sings in many different voices (he's really a vocal chameleon) and the backing music is funky and slick. "It's All Behind You" is a funny and optimistic look at life's mistakes.

The rest of the album ranges from R&B rock to tender piano balladry ("Give It All To Music," "So Fine (It's Frightening)") a little bit like Elton John. There's also some pretty radical experimentation--"Who Am I Talking To" is groovy and hard to categorize, and the album's closer, "Deer Song," is dark and moody with exotic mandolins and a strange lyric.

Overall, Andy Pratt is an adventuresome, catchy, and eccentric album, but its eccentricities only make it better. One of the main problems with pop is that it sounds great at first, then it gets boring really quick. Andy Pratt has enough heart, charm, and unusual wrinkles to sound like an old friend on first listen but also to remain interesting for many repeated listens. Check out itsaboutmusic dot com for Andy's catalog--it's probably less expensive, and has his hard-to-find and REALLY expensive masterpiece Resolution for the price of a regular CD. Enjoy!"