Search - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Giovanni Pergolesi, Anonymous :: Amadeus [Original Soundtrack Recording] [Hybrid SACD]

Amadeus [Original Soundtrack Recording] [Hybrid SACD]
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Giovanni Pergolesi, Anonymous
Amadeus [Original Soundtrack Recording] [Hybrid SACD]
Genres: Special Interest, Pop, Soundtracks
 
  •  Track Listings (9) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #2


      

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CD Reviews

Mozart's music shines in wonderful soundtrack album....
Alex Diaz-Granados | Miami, FL United States | 04/18/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart has been one of my favorite composers for years, especially after I watched Milos Foreman's brilliant film Amadeus, a wonderful adaptation of Peter Shaffer's stage play.While the story and the performances by F. Murray Abraham (Antonio Salieri) and Tom Hulce (W. A. Mozart) were enthralling, the true star of the movie was, of course, Mozart's beautiful and timeless music, and no wonder, for the music supervisor (and conductor) for Amadeus was none other than one of the best interpreters of Mozart's compositions, Sir Neville Marriner.In this wonderful two-disc set of the original soundtrack, Marriner leads the acclaimed Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields orchestra in 20 excerpts from various symphonies, piano concertos, operas, and Mozart's final opus, the Requiem.Disc One begins with the first movement of Mozart's Symphony No. 25 in G minor, K 183, a very dramatic and energetic work which foreshadows the emotionally charged compositions of Beethoven (who was a student of Mozart's) and other composers of the Romantic era. Composed when Mozart was only 17 years old, it is the first symphony he wrote in a minor key. Sweeping and almost stormy at times, it is an apt accompaniment to the film's "I killed Mozart!" opening sequence.Among the other eight tracks on this first disc are excerpts from Giovanni Pergolesi's "Stabat Mater," early 18th Century Gypsy music played on instruments of the period, and more Mozart works ranging from opera (the Turkish Finale from The Abduction from the Seraglio) to the first movement from Symphonie Concertante, K 364.Disc Two contains 11 tracks, including the beautiful third movement of the Piano Concerto in E flat, masterfully played by pianist Ivan Moravec and the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields. Opera and fans of Mozart's works for voice and orchestra will enjoy this second disc, for not only are there excerpts from The Marriage of Figaro (Ecco la Marcia, Ah Tutti Contenti) and Don Giovanni (the famous Commendatore scene from Act II), but also the "Ruhe Stanft" aria from Zaide (featuring the lovely voice of soprano Felicity Lott). Rounding out the bulk of this mostly vocal-works half are five selections from Mozart's Requiem, K 626, a work into which the composer poured his creativity and energies but was unfinished at the time of his death in 1791. Aptly, the final track is the "Romanza" or second movement of the Piano Concerto in D minor, K 466. As played by Imogen Cooper and the orchestra, it reflects various emotions that are normally associated with music from the Romantic era rather than the more sedate and "logical" Classical period in which Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart lived during his brief 36-year sojourn on Earth.The two-disc set also comes with a handy booklet with program notes, divided into "The Story" on one side of the page and "The Music" on the other, helping the listener identify which cue goes with what scene, while at the same time giving brief music appreciation notes to put the works into historical and artistic context.Alex Diaz-Granados"
Salieri's Story....Mozart's Music...Excellent Recording!....
L. Shirley | fountain valley, ca United States | 06/25/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Remember the opening scene from the wonderful film "Amadeus"? A deranged old man screaming his confession of murdering Mozart, his suicide attempt and rushing him to an insane asylum through the wintry streets of Vienna circa 1820's. All this to Mozart's wonderfully intense Symphony No. 25 in the background. As Salieri confesses his story to a priest, the story unfolds, and so does all the music.

This CD is an outstanding recording of the soundtrack from the film and the music directed by Neville Marriner, Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields, is absolutely beautiful. It's mostly Mozart works we hear as Salieri's story unfolds, you can relive those moments if your a fan of the film, or just enjoy this passionate music if you are a fan of Mozart.

Some of Mozart's music included is "Serenade for Winds", "Concerto for Two Pianos", "The Marriage of Fiagaro(actIII and Act IV)", "Don Giovanni(ActII)", and "Requiem" (6,7,8,9,10).You will also find some great choir and early
18th Century Gypsy music which is played on the instruments of the period. There are 20 delicious tracks. Most running a good length between 5 minutes to 13 minutes(there a a few shorter ones as well). For a complete list of songs see the buying info here.

Enclosed is an informative booklet that gives the story along with some facts about each song. It's nice to follow along with.
The CD I have is a 2 dics set distributed by Fantasy, Inc(I didn't see this mentioned in the buying info) and is the same image and exact title as the one here. This is one you can listen to any time, any place, and often! A 5 star
recording for 5 Star
music....enjoy...Laurie

also recommended:
Cinema Choral Classics
Classical Evolution: Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 "Choral"
Le Nozze Di Figaro (Staatskapelle Berlin)"
An excellent soundtrack and an excellent film!!
triscodeca | 05/23/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Eventhough many kids in school listen to rap and all, I listen to classical. After watching Amadeus, I was moved by the pieces selected to be played in the film. I especially liked Symphony No. 29 1st Movement. Also, when Salieri is at the Archbishop of Salzburg's palace and reads Mozart's piece, Serenade for Winds, is among my favorites. In Serenade for Winds, Mozart creates a very emotional and almost night music feel to it. I was surprised that the director/conductor did not put in a few more famous pieces into the album . . . ex. Symphony No. 40, The Magic Flute, etc. This is an excellent album and anyone who wants to enjoy the genius of Mozart should purchase this. Take it from me, you will enjoy this album immesensely."