Search - Alan Silvestri :: Who Framed Roger Rabbit? (OST)

Who Framed Roger Rabbit? (OST)
Alan Silvestri
Who Framed Roger Rabbit? (OST)
Genres: Pop, Soundtracks
 
Out of print in the U.S.! Alan Silvestri's score for the Academy Award winning 1988 Disney blockbuster that featured Bob Hoskins as a human who enters Toon Town to track a killer of a nightclub owner. He crosses paths wit...  more »

      
1

Larger Image

CD Details

All Artists: Alan Silvestri
Title: Who Framed Roger Rabbit? (OST)
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: EMI Import
Release Date: 9/17/2007
Album Type: Import, Soundtrack
Genres: Pop, Soundtracks
Style:
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1

Synopsis

Album Description
Out of print in the U.S.! Alan Silvestri's score for the Academy Award winning 1988 Disney blockbuster that featured Bob Hoskins as a human who enters Toon Town to track a killer of a nightclub owner. He crosses paths with some of the zaniest cartoon characters imaginable and slapstick happens! EMI.

Similar CDs

 

CD Reviews

Fun in a cartoonish sort of way
Brandon Cutro | Tyler, Texas United States | 03/22/2003
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Scoring a live action/animation film can be a difficult thing. Do you mickey mouse every scene or play it straight? Silvestri does both, but mainly in a comic fashion. Lots of jazz musicians from the London Symphony Orchestra, as well as the orchestra itself provide the music and the result is a good one. For the jazz parts, Silvestri throws in a solo trumpet, saxophone, piano, bass, and drums. "Maroon Logo" and "Maroon Cartoon" are 2 mickey-moused tracks, meaning that every action on screen is reflected in the music. I can't help but think back to the old Warner Bros. cartoons here. "Valiant and Valiant" and "Eddie's Theme" are 2 tracks on the slightly somber side, employing the use of the wonderful jazz musicians. "The Weasels" is amusing, while "Hungarian Rhapsody" contains the scene where Donald and Daffy Duck duel with each other on the pianos. "Judge Doom" is the most ominous track on the album, sensing evil is right around the corner. "Why Don't You Do Right" and "The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down" are 2 songs from the film, the former one a sultry and swinging song sung by Jessica Rabbit in the film and the latter a comically entertaining one sung by Roger Rabbit. "Jessica's Theme" is sultry, with a slightly suspect feel to it. "The Gag Factory" is one of the highlights of the album, with the orchestra shining at its best with racing brass rhythms and strings. "The Will" is a great finale track, while "Smile Darn Ya Smile/That's All Folks!" is somewhat of a goofy song with Porky Pig quoting his famous line at the end. The best track is "End Title", which brings together all of the themes in the film into a 5 minute suite. A great effort on Silvestri's part and a wonderful recording, as well as a great orchestral performance."