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Tales of Mystery & Imagination
Alan Parsons Project
Tales of Mystery & Imagination
Genres: Pop, Rock, Classic Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #1

Japanese only 2 x SHM-CD (Super High Material CD - playable on all CD players) paper sleeve pressing. Two CD Deluxe Edition of the debut album from the Alan Parsons Project. featuring the original 1976 mix of the album, th...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Alan Parsons Project
Title: Tales of Mystery & Imagination
Members Wishing: 4
Total Copies: 0
Label: Island / Mercury
Release Date: 10/25/1990
Genres: Pop, Rock, Classic Rock
Styles: Soft Rock, Progressive, Progressive Rock, Album-Oriented Rock (AOR)
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 042283282025

Synopsis

Album Description
Japanese only 2 x SHM-CD (Super High Material CD - playable on all CD players) paper sleeve pressing. Two CD Deluxe Edition of the debut album from the Alan Parsons Project. featuring the original 1976 mix of the album, the 1987 remix and eight previously unreleased bonus tracks! Recorded at Abbey Road in 1975 and released in 1976, the idea for the Project came from manager and writer Eric Woolfson, who saw his role as an auteur, bringing together some of the greatest talents in music to bring to life Poe's sinister, gothic tales. Enlisting the white-hot production whiz-kid Alan Parsons, fresh from his work with Wings and Pink Floyd, the duo set about making dreams reality. The album remains a singular, compelling work and can be seen as a bridge between Pink Floyd's Dark Side Of The Moon and Jeff Wayne's War Of The Worlds. Universal. 2008.

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CD Reviews

Literary and Musical License
P. Mc Hugh | New Jersey | 08/10/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"The previous reviewer railed against the Alan Parsons Project for quoting from Claude Debussy without acknowledging the debt. For centuries, composers have been "borrowing" from each other to create new music. Igor Stravinsky was notable in acknowledging he did "steal" some music from other composers but the art was knowing from whom and when to do the theft.

Copyrighted music does require acknowledgement (and payment) to a composer whose music is incorporated into a new composition. (Remember all the hoopla with rap and hip-hop sampling music of others?) I do not know if Debussy's music is in the public domain or not. Perhaps the Alan Parsons Project should have made an nod to Debussy apparent in the credits, but should we fault the artist for using this music in a new fashion? I think not.

When Keith Emerson borrowed from Bartok, there was not one whit of a mention until reissues of the self-titled album. It was certainly acknowledged for years in trade publications and Keith never said he did not use Bartok. Does it make the music worse? Do you find it disturbing that a musician may not be completely original in the composition, yet is original in the use of the themes from another composer? Do you think it was an intentional rip off?

I think that you enjoyed the album, anyway, is a testament to Alan Parsons ability to produce pleasing and, yes, original music.
Perhaps it was an oversight. But, in no instance should it detract from a great release as this.
"